Yamaha announcing new model this afternoon

Yamaha announcing new model this afternoon

Yamaha MT-07 Tracer spy shot
The MT-07 Tracer spotted testing in Milan last summer

YAMAHA is set to announce a new model later today. Call us premature but we think it’s probably the MT-07 Tracer that we saw in spy shots last year

If it is, it will bring touring ability to the MT-07 recipe in the same way the MT-09 Tracer did for the 07’s bigger brother, with a tall screen and luggage options. 

It’s also likely to make one the of the most affordable tourers and all-rounders on the market, just as the MT-07 is one of the cheapest decent middleweight nakeds. 

A source said this morning: ‘Yamaha Europe will be releasing details of a new model today at 14.00 CET.’

Watch this space. 

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: Yamaha announcing new model this afternoon

What BMWs new G310R adventure bike could look like

What BMWs new G310R adventure bike could look like

BMW F310 GS Adventure

BMW MOTORRAD’S UK director Phil Horton recently confirmed plans for a GS-style G310R derivative, and here’s how Indian bike site RushLane thinks it will look.

The rendering takes the G310R chassis and 313cc single-cylinder engine and re-imagines it packaged as a smaller sibling to the F700GS.

It’s probably not far off the mark, with the possible exception of the exhaust, which appears to exit the front of the cylinder, unlike that of the reverse-cylinder G310R. 

It’s expected to be called either the F310GS or GS310R, according to RushLane. Like the G310R, it will be manufactured by TVS as part of a partnership between the Indian firm and BMW. 

Horton is reported to have said he hopes the mini adventure model will be launched next year. 

Of course we’re still waiting for the launch of the G310R itself. 

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: What BMWs new G310R adventure bike could look like

Yamaha Tracer 700 promo video

Yamaha Tracer 700 promo video

HERE’S Yamaha’s official promotional video for the long-awaited MT-07-based Tracer 700, which was revealed earlier today

It’s a classic tale of boy loses girl, boy gets girl back after moment of clarity riding Tracer 700. 

What? You were hoping to learn something about the bike?  

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: Yamaha Tracer 700 promo video

Yamaha hints at MWT9 launch by 2018

Yamaha hints at MWT9 launch by 2018

Yamaha MWT-9
Yamaha’s MWT-9 concept

Yamaha CEO Hiroyuki Yanagi
Yamaha President and CEO Hiroyuki Yanagi

Yamaha’s President and CEO Hiroyuki Yanagi has hinted at the firm’s future direction, saying it will move into a new ‘vehicle category’, a likely reference to leaning three-wheelers.

Yamaha insiders have already confirmed to Visordown that we’re going to see a production version of the MWT-9 concept, a leaning reverse-trike using the MT-09 engine.

It will join the existing Tricity to expand Yamaha’s three-wheeler line-up.

Hiroyuki Yanagi’s comments came in a Q&A session on the firm’s annual report, in which he outlined plans for the next two years, an indication we’ll see the MWT-9 by 2018 at the latest. 

He said Yamaha had introduced 250 new models across its entire product range since 2013, and another 270 were planned.

When it comes to more conventional bikes, the plan is to continue its successful platform-sharing ideas, reducing the overall number of different engines and chassis while expanding the model line-up.

Last week we saw a spy shot of a new middleweight Ténéré model using the MT-07 engine. 

The annual report says: ‘We will proactively launch distinctive new products that convey Yamaha’s strong brand power.’

The report shows the firm’s finances are healthy, with improvements in sales and operating income but a slight dip in net income – something that’s blamed largely on one-time factors, particularly additional corporate income taxes.

With that strong performance as a background and a positive forecast for the worldwide motorcycle market, the firm appears to be adopting increasingly bold plans.

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: Yamaha hints at MWT9 launch by 2018

Promising Manx racer Billy Redmayne dies after Olivers Mount crash

Promising Manx racer Billy Redmayne dies after Olivers Mount crash

Billy Redmayne
Billy Redmayne was set to make his TT debut this year

MANX racer Billy Redmayne has died following a crash at the Oliver’s Mount Spring Cup on Sunday.

The 25-year-old from Laxey is understood to have been struck from behind on the fastest section of the 2.43-mile Scarborough circuit.

He suffered severe head injuries and was air-lifted to James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough.

The news of his death was confirmed early this morning by his girlfriend Hannah Louise, who wrote on Facebook: ‘We were told that the damage to his brain was too severe for him to ever wake up again. Even if we had waited for the swelling to go down, the damage was too bad.

‘He also wasn’t able to breathe for himself and was kept awake by machines. Myself and his family decided rather than prolong the inevitable, we would turn off his life support machine and donate whatever organs we could.

‘I am holding on to the fact that Billy died doing what he loved, and that was the way he always wanted it.’

She added: ‘Today was our anniversary, we had been together for two years. Today was also the day that I lay in Billy’s arms whilst he took his last breath.’

Billy was set to make his TT debut this year after winning the Junior Manx Grand Prix in 2015. 

He was also member of the Parachute Regiment who had served in Afghanistan.

Race organisers the Auto 66 Club said: ‘Our sincere condolences go out to Billy Redmayne’s family and friends at this devastating time.’

Related Content


Source: Promising Manx racer Billy Redmayne dies after Olivers Mount crash

Harley Roadster Revealed

Harley Roadster Revealed

Harley-Davidson Roadster

WE’LL admit it; if this Harley Roadster rode past right now it’s pretty unlikely that we’d instantly clock it as a new model.

But on closer inspection the new bits start to show. The overall shape is closest to the firm’s Forty-Eight model, but it lacks that bike’s fat front wheel, single seat and tapered exhausts. Its front and rear mudguards are the shortest of any Sportster 1200 derivative, so presumably it could earn a ‘bobber’ designation, but the firm says it’s actually a combination of different styles.

Harley’s official line is that it’s inspired by classic racing bikes and has a profile taken from racing Sportsters of the ’50s and ’60s.

The firm’s styling director Brad Richards said: ‘Since its introduction in 1957, the Harley-Davidson Sportster has proved capable of constant reinvention, and the Roadster writes a new chapter in that story. We’ve watched our customers take the Sportster in so many different directions. The Roadster is a mash-up of styling genres, but the intent was to build a rider’s motorcycle, a Sportster that’s lean and powerful and connects the rider to the road.

‘We wanted to give the Roadster some DNA from the high-performance KHR models of the mid-’50s, and later Sportsters tuned for the drag strip. Those bikes had fenders cut to the struts, the small fuel tank, and were stripped to their bare essentials to achieve a singular performance purpose.’

So, what do you actually get for your £9,695?

There’s the usual 1200cc air-cooled twin, allied in this case to 19-inch front and 18-inch rear wheel – alloys rather than the wire-spokes of more retro models like the Seventy-Two or 1200 Custom.

‘The wheels were inspired by classic laced wheels, and are the most intricate cast wheel we’ve ever created,’ said Harley’s Industrial Designer Ben McGinley. ‘The interlacing spokes shoot outward toward opposite sides of the wheel, creating a dramatic visual effect. These wheels are also very light for their size, which contributes to the Roadster’s handling performance.’

The firm says the 43mm forks are new, and offer more suspension travel than any other bike in the Sporster range (4.5 inches). The rear shocks follow suit with 3.2 inches of travel. Twin front discs are still worthy of mention on a Harley, and of course they have ABS as standard, as do all newly-introduced models over 125cc – we’re really going to have to start taking anti-lock as a given from now on.

It’s on sale right now.

Specs

Length (mm)   2185

Seat Height (mm)        785

Fuel Capacity (litres)  12.5

Dry Weight (kg)          250

Powertrain

Engine Air-cooled, Evolution™

Displacement (cu.cm) 1202

Engine Torque 98 Nm (72.3 ft-lb) @ 3750 RPM

Transmission   5-speed

Wheels/Tyres

Front   Offset-Split 5-Spoke 19 in. x 3 in. (482.6 mm x 76 mm) Tyre: 120/70R19 M/C

Rear     Offset-Split 5-Spoke 18 in. x 4.25 in. (457.2 mm x 108 mm) Tyre: 150/70R18 M/C

Colour Options

Solids: Vivid Black; Black Denim; Velocity Red Sunglo

Two-tones: Billet Silver/Vivid Black

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: Harley Roadster Revealed

KTM 690 Duke longterm update 3 Good at the boring stuff

KTM 690 Duke longterm update 3 Good at the boring stuff

KTM 690 Duke 2016 front end
Getting a new LCD display fitted

I WISH it weren’t this way, but I’ve accepted that life on two wheels isn’t all track days and blissful rides on amazing roads. In fact, at the moment I seem to be spending all my time commuting, schlepping, and using my bike for, well… mundane s*** like rushing to the petrol station for a massive bag of Doritos before Strictly Come Dancing starts.

I haven’t yet talked about how the 690 Duke fairs at any of this because I’ve been busy enjoying it on a track day at Brands Hatch and getting a new exhaust put on; all very aspirational stuff. But if you’re going use a bike every day, then its real world performance, what it’s like when pressed in to the daily grind is crucial.

The 690 Duke manages to make my 14-mile commute into central London a fun experience, even when rampant traffic jams, phone-distracted drivers and erratic private hire cabs are conspiring to put me in a bad mood, or hospital.

I’ve already talked about how light and nimble the 690 Duke is on track and of course its low weight also means it’s as deft at navigating a gridlocked Elephant & Castle roundabout as it is a set of hairpins on Gran Canaria. In the quest for the next gap, fuelled by the burning desire to get to the office, the Duke is easy to thread between bumpers and can can turn nice and tightly with minimal effort. Because it’s light and nicely balanced, it’s easy to control at slow speed. All in all, its adept in traffic.

It’s narrow too and easy to gauge how big a gap I can fit through because my elbows are the widest point on the bike. The mirrors can sabotage the 690’s filtering finesse though because they’re at a similar height to a lot of vans’ mirrors, along with those of many 4x4s, so care needs to be taken when trying to pass between any cars sat next to each other with mirrors at that height.

While the 690 Duke manages to make my slog to and from the office more enjoyable than it’s got any right to be, it’s not a bike that’s at its most content in the city and on the two warmest days we’ve had this year, watching the 690’s temperature bar creep up before the LCD display throws up a warning has reminded me that it’s not 100% happy being sat in a snarl-up by Waterloo station. I’ll let you know if this becomes a regular occurrence when summer starts proper.

If you read my last report, you might remember that the LCD screen developed a line of dead pixels. KTM has just replaced the screen for me, which was covered under the warranty and because it plugs in to the bike, it didn’t take long at all.

While I was up at KTM HQ getting that done, I also asked them to add the ‘Track Pack’, which costs £244.54 and involves plugging the bike into a diagnostics computer to turn on the ride modes, traction control, MSR (Motor Slip Regulation) and skid mode (aka supermoto ABS, which disables the ABS at the rear). When it comes to the traction control on the road, knowing there’s a bit of a safety net at the rear wheel results in a bit more confidence to gas it out of my favourite bends. The system doesn’t feel particularly intrusive, apart from when it’s working overtime in the rain, when I’m glad to feel it. I can’t wait to properly try it out on track at some point soon.

So now to answer the burning question – what’s it like on fuel? I’ve got a mean average of 47.2mpg, which comes from the past four times I’ve filled it up and calculated consumption. Owing to the fact that the engine feels its smoothest when it’s spinning quickly, it never feels like a particularly economical bike, so I wasn’t expecting a figure in the high 40s. I expect I can get that figure higher too because I’m guilty of riding this bike with no sympathy for how much petrol its using, so I will be seeing what kind of economy it gives me when I’m sensible with it. If I can be sensible with it.

Next on the list is to tidy up some of the Duke’s styling a little, starting by reducing the mass of number plate hanger that’s dangling over the rear wheel and then maybe adorning it with some trinkets to make it look a bit blinged up. I’ve got my eye on a clear air box too, along with some crash protection. I’m also planning a long weekend away on it to really get sense of what it’s like when it’s bullied into doing something that requires a bit of comfort and practicality, and to see whether it can still enthral on a cross-country expedition.

Changes made so far

Akrapovic slip-on – £567.26

‘Track pack’ – £244.54

Previous long-term reports

#1 – Say hello to my little friend

#2 – First service and Brands Hatch

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.

Related Content


Source: KTM 690 Duke longterm update 3 Good at the boring stuff

Ducati signs Lorenzo for 2017

Ducati signs Lorenzo for 2017

THE FACTORY Ducati Team has signed Jorge Lorenzo for the 2017 MotoGP season. 

The news follows and earlier announcement that Movistar Yamaha and Jorge Lorenzo were to part company after 2016.

Lorenzo is now set to ride the Ducati Desmosedici GP in 2017 and 2018, competing alongside new team-mate Luigi Dall’Igna.

Dall’Igna was heavily involved in both of Lorenzo’s 250cc t**les with Aprilia, and the two should make a formidable pairing.

Ducati hopes Lorenzo will provide the boost the team needs to take its first t**le since Casey Stoner’s in 2007. Since Dall’Igna joined the Bologna factory, the team has consistently finished in the top five.

It will be the first time Lorenzo has ridden any MotoGP machine aside from the Yamaha M1. 

  • Sign up for Visordown’s weekly newsletter, Bugsplat, to get the best motorcycle news, road tests and features plus exclusive competitions and offers direct to your inbox. Register as a Visordown member here and tick the box for Bugsplat in your newsletter settings here.